Events – Danspace Project
Andros Zins-Browne and Ley. Photo: Julieta Cervantes.

Andros Zins-Browne: duel H

Thursday, February 1 | 7:30PM
Friday, February 2 | 7:30PM
Saturday, February 3 | 7:30PM

Open Dress Rehearsal*:
Tuesday, January 30 | 7:30pm
(the open dress rehearsal is currently at capacity)

2022-23 Renewal Residency Artist Andros Zins-Browne is an NYC-born performance and dance artist whose work has been presented and commissioned globally.

Zins-Browne’s recent work (duel c, River-To-River Festival, 2023) explores ideas of care and violence commingled between bodies. With duel    H, he extends his inquiry into relationships between bodies and ecology, exploring fluidity between human animals and land in their potentialities.

Inhabiting a space where binaries as care and violence, human and non-human, above and below might intertwine, the performance rearranges the hierarchical terms we habitually stand on.

Underground
Under the ground
Beneath the earth
Below the surface
Be low

To exist
An ex-pression of
Ex-
A life out of / from
negation

When life on earth seemed uninhabitable,
We went under
sub
-stance
-liminal
-sists

Subterranean growth
Subterranean light
Subterranean joy

 

*About Open Dress Rehearsal: Tuesday evening’s dress rehearsal will be free with RSVP and open to the public at limited-capacity. Open dress rehearsals are a mask-required, community-minded program prioritizing our immunocompromised and low-income audiences. Staff and audiences will be required to wear masks (N95 or KN95) and performing artists (if unmasked) will be  required to test for COVID-19 (rapid tests provided by Danspace Project).


BUY TICKETS


VIEW THE PERFORMANCE PROGRAM


Support for duel   H: This project is made possible, in part, with funds from the NYS DanceForce, a partnership program of the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature. Zins-Browne received a Danspace Project Renewal Residency with support from Mellon Foundation. This project is supported, in part, by The Cheswatyr Foundation. Residency and materials support from Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.


Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Andros Zins-Browne, born in New York in 1981, works at the intersection of performance and dance. His work extends choreographic notions into encounters with dancers, nondancers, singers, objects, and texts. Since 2016, his performance Already Unmade where he de-hearses previous works, ‘unmaking’ them, has been presented at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Rockbund Art Museum, Shanghai; and Lafayette Anticipations, Fondation Galeries Lafayette, Paris. In 2019, Atlas Unlimited, a series of exhibitions in collaboration with artist Karthik Pandian, was featured at the PERFORMA19 Biennial, New York, and as a series of music videos currently presented on the Criterion Channel. In 2020/21, his work was commissioned for online projects by Danspace Project, the Aspen Art Museum, and Triple Canopy. In 2022, Zins-Browne premiered color a body who flees, a collaborative sound installation and performance series at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. Performance remixes include The Tony Cokes Remixes, 10th Berlin Biennale (2018), Dia Art Foundation (2023); See-Saw, MoMA, New York (2019) and Asymmetry 222, Getty Museum, Los Angeles by Simone Forti; as well as Jérôme Bel, 1995 (2020) KADIST, Paris, in collaboration with e-flux (2020). In collaboration with Ley, Kris Lee and a host of co-conspirators, Zins-Browne premiered duel c (River-To-River Festival, 2023) a performance that ascended Outlook Hill on Governors’ Island, in a choreography that stirs towards a commingling of care and violence. Zins-Browne is the recipient of awards from the Goethe-Institut; Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; Ministry of Culture of the Flemish Community; and New York State Council on the Arts.

A video still portrait of a light-skinned black woman in a bright loft with salt and pepper disheveled hair pulled back, a slight smile, wearing a black tank top.
Photo courtesy of Leslie Cuyjet.

Research Artist-in-Residence: Leslie Cuyjet

Danspace Project continues to support the creative process and artistic research, welcoming dance artists Leslie Cuyjet and Niall Jones as 2023-24 Research Artists-in-Residence. 

Learn more about our residency programs

Residencies are not open to the public.

Leslie Cuyjet is an award-winning performer and artist. Her dances often integrate text, video, and live performance while interrogating the performing body, personal legacy, and dance history. Mostly known as a performer, she is also a writer and editor, video dabbler, as well as co-founder of the Authentic Movement collective, Duvet, which all play an ongoing role in shaping her interdisciplinary artistic practice. Recent honors include Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grants for Artists (2022), Princeton Hodder Fellowship (2021), and an Outstanding Choreographer/Creator “Bessie” Award (2022) for her solo work, Blur. Leslie lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Iris McCloughan by Whitney Browne. Ayano Elson by Elyse Mertz.

DraftWork: Ayano Elson + Iris McCloughan

Saturday, February 24 | 3PM

Danspace Project’s DraftWork series hosts free, informal showings of new works in varying stages of development. This afternoon features performances by two NYC-based artists: Ayano Elson and Iris McCloughan.

Showings are followed by a reception, conversation, and Q&A between the artists and DraftWork curator, Ishmael Houston-Jones.


RSVP HERE


Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Ayano Elson is an Okinawan-American dancer and choreographer based in New York City. She uses improvisation, imagination, and collaboration to make research-based scores, musical compositions, and site-specific dances. Ayano has performed her work at Abrons Arts Center, 411 Kent, the Chocolate Factory, Gibney Dance, ISSUE Project Room, Movement Research, PAGEANT, and Roulette, among others. She has held artist residencies at Center for Performance Research and Abrons Arts Center (2022), Lower Manhattan Cultural Center and ArtCake (2021), and Movement Research Van Lier Emerging Artist of Color Fellow (2018). Her works-in-process were supported by AUNTS, Seoul Dance Center, Knockdown Center, Movement Research at the Judson Church. She has received funding support from Foundation for Contemporary Arts and Mertz Gilmore Foundation. As a dancer, she’s performed in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago in works by Laurie Berg, Kim Brandt, Jesi Cook, Milka Djordjevich, devynn emory, Simone Forti, Niall Jones, Haegue Yang, and Kyli Kleven at venues including the Chocolate Factory, Dia: Beacon, Danspace Project, Guggenheim Museum, the Kitchen, MoMA, MoMA PS1, New York Live Arts, MCA Chicago, Pioneer Works, Roulette and REDCAT. ayanoelson.com

Iris McCloughan is a performance maker and writer. Working between and across disciplines, their work considers the queer trans body, its social and discursive constructions, and its expansive potential. Iris’s performance works have been presented in New York (PAGEANT, BAX, The Poetry Project, Ars Nova, Movement Research at the Judson Church), Philadelphia (The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia Contemporary, FringeArts), Chicago (Links Hall, ACRE Projects), Detroit (Public Pool), Los Angeles (PURE O), and elsewhere. Recent direction includes Joan Jonas and Eiko Otake’s collaborative performance Drawing in Circles WHY? (Danspace Project/Castelli Gallery) and Alex Tatarsky’s Sad Boys in Harpy Land (Playwrights Horizons). Iris is a past winner of the Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from American Poetry Review, and was named a finalist in nonfiction for Best of the Net 2020. They are the author of three poetry chapbooks, including Triptych (greying ghost, 2022) and Bones to Peaches (Seven Kitchens Press, 2021). Iris’s writing has appeared in American Poetry Review, Prelude, Tupelo Quarterly, juked, jubilat, Gertrude, Denver Quarterly, and Queen Mob’s Teahouse, among many others. Iris has held residencies through Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, The Chocolate Factory Theater, JACK Brooklyn, BEAM Center, Ars Nova, The Orchard Project, and the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership. Iris has collaborated with many other artists and writers, including Eiko Otake, Joan Jonas, Mike Lala, Toby Altman, Alex Tatarsky, Jessie Young, Doug LeCours, Beth Gill, and Julie Mayo.

Jason Rodriguez. Courtesy the artist.

Food for Thought. Curated by Jason Rodriguez

Friday, March 1 | 7:30PM
Dahlia Khair, Rinor Zymberi, Jason Rodriguez

Saturday, March 2 | 7:30PM
Dahlia Khair, Rinor Zymberi, Jose Lapaz Rodriguez

Admission: $5 + 2 cans of food OR $10.
**CASH ONLY!**

 

Danspace’s Food for Thought series returns!

Part food-drive, part performance, Food For Thought collects canned food donations to support local food distribution programs.

This installment of the beloved series will be guest-curated by Jason Rodriguez (aka Slim 007). A dancer, choreographer, teacher, and regular in the Golden Globe nominated Pose, Rodriguez has taught Vogue around the world and currently teaches at various schools and institutions throughout New York City, where he was born and raised.

Rodriguez will host two evenings of improvisation across multiple dance forms with Jose Lapaz Rodriguez, Dahlia Khair, Rinor Zymberi, and Rodriguez himself.


RSVP


Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Jason Anthony Rodriguez is a Dominican-American actor/dancer. Born and raised from Washington Heights in New York City. Went to SUNY Purchase where he received a BA in Arts Management while also studying dance. Found voguing through Benny Ninja and began training under him. He also received mentorship from Dorit Koppel and Kevin Wynn. Trained at Susan Batson Studio in New York City.

‍He was a Series Regular in Ryan Murphy’s Emmy and Golden Globe -nominated series Pose as “Lamar”. He was Movement Coach for all 3 seasons of Pose and choreographed for season 2. He guest-starred in the Season Finale of The Deuce on HBO as “Enrico”.

‍He has been featured in the NY Times 5 times by Siobhan Burke, Gia Kourlas and Illise S. Carter.

“Mr. Rodriguez is a subtle scene stealer as Lamar on the FX show “Pose,”- Gia Kourlas NY TimesHe has taught vogue in various institutions throughout the states. He has taught internationally in Dominican Republic, Vienna and Japan.

‍Recently co-founded Arraygency with Ricardo Sebastian which supports in managing BIPOC Queer & Trans folks and brings them to the forefront of all creative industries.

Nasa4nasa, two Egyptian performers at Movement Research at the Judson Church. They both wear matching purple tops and black bottoms.
Photo: Rachel Keane.

Movement Research Festival 2024: nasa4nasa

Thursday, March 7 | 7:30pm
nasa4nasa (Egypt)
NO MERCY

 

The Movement Research Festival returns for the first time since 2019 with events happening over two weeks in late February/early March 2024, including three evenings of performances at Danspace Project.

The 2024 festival is curated by Marýa Wethers, Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, with a focus on the artists and partnerships developed through the GPS MENA Exchange program since 2019. The Festival events will include GPS Chats, workshops, Movement Research at the Judson Church, Studies Project, and performances at Danspace Project. 

The program on Thursday, March 7, features nasa4nasa (Egypt). NO MERCY by nasa4nasa navigates their daily virtual and non-virtual modes of feelings. During this 45-minute DJ set, nasa4nasa explores the limits of sensuality and desire and its interplay with violence. The two female bodies navigate the gaze, referencing their repertoires of body image, pop, rage and intimacy. nasa4nasa will lure you in, disarm you and in the process unravel in their own drama.


RSVP HERE


The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program provides a platform for the international exchange of ideas, processes and reflective practices surrounding dance and movement based forms between the U.S. and independent performing arts communities internationally. GPS posits that dialogue across differences necessarily catalyzes the generation of new knowledge and creative innovation. By investing in the mobility of artists, curators and cultural workers, GPS advances cross-cultural understanding and the development of the contemporary arts field at large. Officially established in 2016, GPS consists of an informal network of partners currently supporting exchange projects in Eastern and Central Europe (ECE) and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions.

The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program is directed by Marýa Wethers and has received support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding and the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund.


Accessibility: Danspace Project is committed to increasing the accessibility of our space and programs. If our space or a particular event is not accessible to you for any reason, if you have accessibility questions or accessibility needs that haven’t been addressed, please email seta@danspaceproject.org.

Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Other performances

Movement Research, founded in 1978, is one of the world’s leading laboratories for the investigation of dance and movement-based forms. Valuing the individual artist, their creative process and their vital role within society, Movement Research is dedicated to the creation and implementation of free and low-cost programs that nurture and instigate discourse and experimentation. Movement Research strives to reflect the cultural, political and economic diversity of its moving community, including artists and audiences alike. movementresearch.org

Marýa Wethers (she, her, hers) is a Creative Producer & Independent Curator and contemporary dancer based in Lenapehoking NYC since 1997. Marýa is currently the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research and Creative Producer for Edisa Weeks/DELIRIOUS Dances, OzuzuDances (Onye Ozuzu), and Rosy Simas Danse. She previously worked with Makini (jumatatu m. poe), Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light, nora chipaumire, Paloma McGregor/Angela’s Pulse, David Thomson, Olivier Tarpaga/Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project, and others. As the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, Marýa supervises multiple exchange projects in the Eastern & Central Europe and Middle East & North Africa (MENA) regions as well as the regional network of partners throughout the Eastern/Central European region. From 2007-2014, she worked in the Programming Department at New York Live Arts (formerly Dance Theater Workshop/DTW) as the International Project Director of the Suitcase Fund program, where she created a cultural exchange program between contemporary dance artists in Africa and the U.S. Under her leadership, the three-year pilot program supported cultural exchange projects in nine countries in Africa and the Middle East (Senegal, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and Madagascar as well as Lebanon and Palestine). In addition, she managed the Suitcase Fund program activities and network of partners in the Eastern/Central Europe region. As a Curator, Marýa conceived and created the three-week performance series “Gathering Place: Black Queer Land(ing)” at Gibney Dance in 2018. She was a guest curator for the Watershed Lab residency at Mount Tremper Arts (2018 & 2019), Queer New York International Arts Festival (2016 & 2015 editions) launching a focus on African artists in the festival, and the Out of Space @ BRIC Studio series for Danspace Project (2003-2007) with a particular focus on work representing the perspectives and experiences of artists who are of color, queer, and/or female. Marýa is also a contemporary dancer and received a 2017 NY Dance & Performance (“Bessie”) Award for Outstanding Performance with the Skeleton Architecture collective. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Dance, minor in African-American Studies, 1997.

Sahar Damoni lies on the hardwood floor at the Judson Memorial church. She wears a red dress and has her legs up in the air while one hand reaches in between and the other on her thigh. Her eyes are closed.
Photo: Ian Douglas.

Movement Research Festival 2024: Sahar Damoni

Friday, March 8 | 7:30pm

Sahar Damoni (Palestine)
Eat Banana and Drink Pills

 

The Movement Research Festival returns for the first time since 2019 with events happening over two weeks in late February/early March 2024, including three evenings of performances at Danspace Project.

The 2024 festival is curated by Marýa Wethers, Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, with a focus on the artists and partnerships developed through the GPS MENA Exchange program since 2019. The Festival events will include GPS Chats, workshops, Movement Research at the Judson Church, Studies Project, and performances at Danspace Project. 

The program on Friday, March 8, features Sahar Damoni (Palestine). Eat Banana and Drink Pills is a contemporary dance performance about abortion among single Arab Palestinian women. The work focuses on the physical and emotional experience, and the social dimensions for this experience. The work analyzes ramifications of this choice and the stigma, trauma, and social violence it carries. 

“The traumatic moment engraved in the psyche is translated into an uninhibited immersion of the choreographer in the body, in a way that merges the past with the present into an unfiltered “now,” and only at the end does the understanding sharpen that this shared and exposed time with the audience holds the possibility of healing.” (Idit Suslik, Writer, The Contemporary Eye)


RSVP HERE


The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program provides a platform for the international exchange of ideas, processes and reflective practices surrounding dance and movement based forms between the U.S. and independent performing arts communities internationally. GPS posits that dialogue across differences necessarily catalyzes the generation of new knowledge and creative innovation. By investing in the mobility of artists, curators and cultural workers, GPS advances cross-cultural understanding and the development of the contemporary arts field at large. Officially established in 2016, GPS consists of an informal network of partners currently supporting exchange projects in Eastern and Central Europe (ECE) and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions.

The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program is directed by Marýa Wethers and has received support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding and the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund.


Accessibility: Danspace Project is committed to increasing the accessibility of our space and programs. If our space or a particular event is not accessible to you for any reason, if you have accessibility questions or accessibility needs that haven’t been addressed, please email seta@danspaceproject.org.

Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Other performances

Movement Research, founded in 1978, is one of the world’s leading laboratories for the investigation of dance and movement-based forms. Valuing the individual artist, their creative process and their vital role within society, Movement Research is dedicated to the creation and implementation of free and low-cost programs that nurture and instigate discourse and experimentation. Movement Research strives to reflect the cultural, political and economic diversity of its moving community, including artists and audiences alike. movementresearch.org

Marýa Wethers (she, her, hers) is a Creative Producer & Independent Curator and contemporary dancer based in Lenapehoking NYC since 1997. Marýa is currently the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research and Creative Producer for Edisa Weeks/DELIRIOUS Dances, OzuzuDances (Onye Ozuzu), and Rosy Simas Danse. She previously worked with Makini (jumatatu m. poe), Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light, nora chipaumire, Paloma McGregor/Angela’s Pulse, David Thomson, Olivier Tarpaga/Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project, and others. As the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, Marýa supervises multiple exchange projects in the Eastern & Central Europe and Middle East & North Africa (MENA) regions as well as the regional network of partners throughout the Eastern/Central European region. From 2007-2014, she worked in the Programming Department at New York Live Arts (formerly Dance Theater Workshop/DTW) as the International Project Director of the Suitcase Fund program, where she created a cultural exchange program between contemporary dance artists in Africa and the U.S. Under her leadership, the three-year pilot program supported cultural exchange projects in nine countries in Africa and the Middle East (Senegal, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and Madagascar as well as Lebanon and Palestine). In addition, she managed the Suitcase Fund program activities and network of partners in the Eastern/Central Europe region. As a Curator, Marýa conceived and created the three-week performance series “Gathering Place: Black Queer Land(ing)” at Gibney Dance in 2018. She was a guest curator for the Watershed Lab residency at Mount Tremper Arts (2018 & 2019), Queer New York International Arts Festival (2016 & 2015 editions) launching a focus on African artists in the festival, and the Out of Space @ BRIC Studio series for Danspace Project (2003-2007) with a particular focus on work representing the perspectives and experiences of artists who are of color, queer, and/or female. Marýa is also a contemporary dancer and received a 2017 NY Dance & Performance (“Bessie”) Award for Outstanding Performance with the Skeleton Architecture collective. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Dance, minor in African-American Studies, 1997.

Dancer wearing black pants and shoes in various movement positions. The photos are in black and white.
Photo by Sebastian Bauer

Movement Research Festival 2024: Charlie Prince

Saturday, March 9 | 7:30pm

Charlie Prince (Lebanon)
Cosmic A*

 

The Movement Research Festival returns for the first time since 2019 with events happening over two weeks in late February/early March 2024, including three evenings of performances at Danspace Project.

The 2024 festival is curated by Marýa Wethers, Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, with a focus on the artists and partnerships developed through the GPS MENA Exchange program since 2019. The Festival events will include GPS Chats, workshops, Movement Research at the Judson Church, Studies Project, and performances at Danspace Project. 

The program on Saturday, March 9, features Charlie Prince (Lebanon). Cosmic A* (2021), created and performed by Charlie Prince, is a 45 minute solo work that observes the body as an archaeological space, and engages this body in rituals of excavation – revealing new and unbound mythologies – allowing for a limitless agency of self-representation and rootedness.

In this new version created for the MR Festival, Charlie reflects on the last three years, looking back and looking in as a transposition of the work for a different context and time period. Digging into his training as a musician, Charlie will bring elements of live sound he creates as the performer. Exploring his internal artistic update and projecting images of archival footage of Beirut.


RSVP HERE


The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program provides a platform for the international exchange of ideas, processes and reflective practices surrounding dance and movement based forms between the U.S. and independent performing arts communities internationally. GPS posits that dialogue across differences necessarily catalyzes the generation of new knowledge and creative innovation. By investing in the mobility of artists, curators and cultural workers, GPS advances cross-cultural understanding and the development of the contemporary arts field at large. Officially established in 2016, GPS consists of an informal network of partners currently supporting exchange projects in Eastern and Central Europe (ECE) and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) regions.

The GPS/Global Practice Sharing program is directed by Marýa Wethers and has received support from the Trust for Mutual Understanding and the Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller Fund.


Accessibility: Danspace Project is committed to increasing the accessibility of our space and programs. If our space or a particular event is not accessible to you for any reason, if you have accessibility questions or accessibility needs that haven’t been addressed, please email seta@danspaceproject.org.

Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project

Other performances

Movement Research, founded in 1978, is one of the world’s leading laboratories for the investigation of dance and movement-based forms. Valuing the individual artist, their creative process and their vital role within society, Movement Research is dedicated to the creation and implementation of free and low-cost programs that nurture and instigate discourse and experimentation. Movement Research strives to reflect the cultural, political and economic diversity of its moving community, including artists and audiences alike. movementresearch.org

Marýa Wethers (she, her, hers) is a Creative Producer & Independent Curator and contemporary dancer based in Lenapehoking NYC since 1997. Marýa is currently the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research and Creative Producer for Edisa Weeks/DELIRIOUS Dances, OzuzuDances (Onye Ozuzu), and Rosy Simas Danse. She previously worked with Makini (jumatatu m. poe), Alice Sheppard/Kinetic Light, nora chipaumire, Paloma McGregor/Angela’s Pulse, David Thomson, Olivier Tarpaga/Baker & Tarpaga Dance Project, and others. As the Director of the GPS/Global Practice Sharing program at Movement Research, Marýa supervises multiple exchange projects in the Eastern & Central Europe and Middle East & North Africa (MENA) regions as well as the regional network of partners throughout the Eastern/Central European region. From 2007-2014, she worked in the Programming Department at New York Live Arts (formerly Dance Theater Workshop/DTW) as the International Project Director of the Suitcase Fund program, where she created a cultural exchange program between contemporary dance artists in Africa and the U.S. Under her leadership, the three-year pilot program supported cultural exchange projects in nine countries in Africa and the Middle East (Senegal, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and Madagascar as well as Lebanon and Palestine). In addition, she managed the Suitcase Fund program activities and network of partners in the Eastern/Central Europe region. As a Curator, Marýa conceived and created the three-week performance series “Gathering Place: Black Queer Land(ing)” at Gibney Dance in 2018. She was a guest curator for the Watershed Lab residency at Mount Tremper Arts (2018 & 2019), Queer New York International Arts Festival (2016 & 2015 editions) launching a focus on African artists in the festival, and the Out of Space @ BRIC Studio series for Danspace Project (2003-2007) with a particular focus on work representing the perspectives and experiences of artists who are of color, queer, and/or female. Marýa is also a contemporary dancer and received a 2017 NY Dance & Performance (“Bessie”) Award for Outstanding Performance with the Skeleton Architecture collective. She graduated from Mount Holyoke College with a BA in Dance, minor in African-American Studies, 1997.

Hsiao-jou Tang, Stacy Spence, Tim Bendernagel. Photo: Myssi Robinson.

Stacy Matthew Spence: I am, here; Here with us; Where we find ourselves

Thursday, March 21 | 7:30PM
Friday, March 22 | 7:30PM
Saturday, March 23 | 7:30PM

Open Dress Rehearsal*:
Tuesday, March 19 | 7:30pm
CLICK HERE TO RSVP FOR OPEN DRESS REHEARSAL


Stacy Spence’s dance work often explores the exchange between person and environment.
This involves playful interactions and movement generated in response to the places he finds himself – studio, home, and in public spaces. Presently, he brings his attention to the internal space of “me”– as a personal environment to be outwardly created, expressed, occupied, and shared.

His new dance in triptych form, I am, here (a solo), Here with us (a duet), Where we find ourselves (a quartet), created in collaboration with dance artists Tim Bendernagel, Joanna Kotze, Hsiao-jou Tang, singer/musician Charlotte Jacobs, percussionist Raf Vertessen, and costumer Athena Kokoronis, explores ideas of self, impulse, and sharing. 

How do we find ourselves? How do we find our place? How do we find each other?

 

*About Open Dress Rehearsal: Tuesday evening’s dress rehearsal will be free with RSVP and open to the public at limited-capacity. Open dress rehearsals are a mask-required, community-minded program prioritizing our immunocompromised and low-income audiences. Staff and audiences will be required to wear masks (N95 or KN95) and performing artists (if unmasked) will be  required to test for COVID-19 (rapid tests provided by Danspace Project). RSVP here.


BUY TICKETS


Before you visit:

Accessibility at Danspace Project
Covid Safety at Danspace Project



This project was supported, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature, and with support from Gibney’s Dance in Process Residency Program with generous support from the Mellon Foundation and support from the A M Foundation.

Stacy Matthew Spence is a New York City based choreographer, dancer, and teacher. Stacyʼs choreography has been commissioned by The High Line in collaboration with visual artist Ronny Quevedo, Danspace Project, The New School, Ishmael Houston-Jones’s Platform 2012: Parallels for Danspace Project, Tisch School of the Arts and London Contemporary Dance School. Stacy has been honored to perform in co/motion directed by Margaret Peak as part of Jason Moranʼs Whitney Biennial: Bleed, Deborah Hayʼs Blues as part of Ralph Lemonʼs One Fine Day at The Museum of Modern Art NY and Joanna Kotze’s BIG BEATS.

Stacy had the pleasure of dancing with The Trisha Brown Dance Company from 1997-2006, was Education Director 2018-2020 and continues collaborating with the company through teaching and re-staging Trisha’s work. He has taught nationally and internationally at institutions such as The New School, Juilliard, Barnard College, Movement Research, Tisch School of the Arts, Manhattan Marymount College, London Contemporary Dance School and Centre National de Danse Contemporaine.

Stacy’s work has been supported through Gibney Dance in Process (DiP) Resident Artist 2022-23, Movement Research Artist Parent Residency; Movement Research Artist-in-Residence, Workspace Artist-in-Residence, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council NY; Manhattan Community Fund, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, NY; New York Live Arts Studio Series Residency; Artist Residency at Centre National de Danse Contemporaine in Angers, France.

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